10 Black Eyed Susan Vine Care – Tips for Growing 2022

10 Black Eyed Susan Vine Care – Tips for Growing 2022

Rudbeckia hirta, commonly called black-eyed Susan, is a North American flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, native to Eastern and Central North America and naturalized in the Western part of the continent as well as in China.

  • Scientific name: Rudbeckia hirta
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Order: Asterales
  • Kingdom: Plantae

The black-eyed Susan vine plant is a tender perennial grown annually in temperate and cold zones. You can also increase the vine as a houseplant, but be careful as it can grow up to 8 ft 2+ m. In Caring for the vine, Black-eyed Susan is most successful when the plant’s native African climate can be mimicked. Try growing a black-eyed Susan vine indoors or outdoors for a cheerful and bright flowering vine.

1. Black-eyed Susan Vine Plant

Thunbergia alata, or the black-eyed Susan vine, is a common houseplant. It is Probably because it is easy to propagate from stem cuttings and therefore easy for owners to pass a piece of the plant over.

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Native to Africa, the vine needs warm temperatures and requires shelter from the sun’s hottest rays. The stems and leaves are green, and the flowers are usually deep yellow, white or orange with black centres. There are also red, salmon, and ivory flower varieties.

Black-eyed Susan is a fast-growing vine that needs vertical support or trellis to support the plant. The vines wrap around themselves and anchor the plant to vertical structures.

2. Growing a black-eyed Susan vine

You can grow a black-eyed Susan vine from seed. Begin sowing indoors six to eight weeks before the last frost or outdoors when soils warm to 60 F. 16 C. Seeds will emerge 10 to 14 days after sowing if temperatures are warm. 70 to 75 F. 21-24 C. It may take up to 20 days to appear in colder areas.

Growing a black-eyed Susan vine from cuttings is easier. Spend the winter cutting several inches off the terminal end of a healthy plant. Remove the lower leaves and place them in a glass of water to root. Change the water every other day. Once you have thick roots, plant the start in potting soil in a well-draining pot. Grow the plant until spring and then transplant outdoors when temperatures rise, and there is no chance of frost.

Place the plants in full sun with afternoon shade or partially shaded locations when growing a black-eyed Susan vine. The vine is only hardy USDA plant hardiness zones 10 and 11. In other zones, take the plant to overwinter indoors.

10 Black Eyed Susan Vine Care – Tips for Growing 2022

3. How to Care for Black-Eyed Susan Vines

This plant has some special needs, so you will need some advice on caring for black-eyed Susan vines.

First, the plant requires well-drained soil, but it will wilt if the ground becomes too dry. The humidity level, especially for potted plants, is an excellent line. Keep it moderately moist but never soggy.

Black-eyed Susan vine care outdoors is easy as long as you water moderately, give the plant trellis, and a deadhead. You can prune it lightly in the higher areas where it grows perennial to keep the plant on the frame or line. Young plants will benefit from plant ties to help them establish themselves in their growing structure.

Growing a black-eyed Susan vine indoors requires a bit more maintenance. Fertilize potted plants once a year in spring with water-soluble plant food. Provide a stake to grow or plant in a hanging basket and let the vines fall gracefully.

4. A beautiful and popular flower

Black-eyed Susans deserve a place in every flower garden. They are relatives of asters and sunflowers and are one of the most popular plants to grow. Because they are so easily replanted, they can be found in all 48 continental states except Utah and Nevada. They can also be seen growing in Canada.

The wildflower is smaller than the hybrid ones. When I was a kid in Ohio, I remember growing wild along our shore. The flowers were as big as a quarter. The newer varieties are much more significant.

There are several varieties of Rudbeckia. This plant is from the Asteraceae family and is known as rudbeckia hirta.

 Some varieties are classified as annuals and others biennial or short-lived perennials. If you do grow them, it’s a good idea to let them reseed themselves or help them plant some seeds yourself. Then you will have many plants, and new plants will appear year after year.

5. Reasons for planting

  1. Rudbeckia attracts both butterflies and hummingbirds.
  2. Theyy make a beautifully coloured stand in the garde with their bright coloursn.
  3. The plants are resistant to deer and rabbits. Its hairy stems and leaves are not pleasant to eat.
  4. They make an excellent cut flower.
  5. They are resistant to drought and easy to grow.
  6. If desired, they work well as a dried flowers.
  7. Birds enjoy the seeds in the winter months.

Types of Black-Eyed Susans

  • Rudbeckia fulgida
  • Brown‑eyed susan
  • Cutleaf coneflower
  • Rudbeckia californica
  • Rudbeckia alpicola
  • Rudbeckia occidentalis
  • Rudbeckia maxima

Biennial plants examples

  • Allium strictum
  • Allium macropetalum
  • Wood Forget‑me‑not
  • Allium pskemense
  • Allium obliquum
  • Allium nutans
  • Hollyhock
10 Black Eyed Susan Vine Care - Tips for Growing 2022
10 Black Eyeed Susan Vine Care – Tips for Growing 2022

6. Attributes of Black-Eyed Susans

  1. This Rudbeckia will thrive in USDA zones 3-7.
  2. The flowers are bright yellow with brown to black centres. The exception is the Irish Eyes variety with its green centre. They are 2 to 3 inches wide.
  3. The leaves and stems are hairy and spicy.
  4. Height is 2-3 feet.
  5. It will spread 1-2 feet.
  6. If you keep the plant dies, it will flower from June to September.
  7. The stems are 2 to 3 feet tall.
  8. Most plants will survive for about three years. If you allow them to reseed, you will have all the rudbeckias you could want. Just leave the seeds for the birds to eat and blow them in the wind to re-sow.

7. How to plant black-eyed Susans

Plant from seed

  1. For an early start, the seed can be planted indoors 6 to 8 weeks before the last frost date.
  2. If you sow seeds directly into the ground, wait until the date of the last frost in your area.
  3. Well-drained soil is best. Make sure the soil is moist when you plant the seeds.
  4. Plant in partial shade in full sun. Full sun is preferred.
  5. Plant the seeds. Cover the source lightly with soil. They need light to germinate.
  6. You will have to wait up to a month before you see the seeds sprout from the ground. In ideal conditions, it can take as little as a week.

8. Rudbeckia transplant

  1. Drill a slightly more extensive and more profound hole than the plant’s container.
  2. If the plant is rooted, gently tear the outer roots and spread them out to stimulate growth.
  3. As long as the soil is already well-drained, you can place the plant in the ground and pile-soil around it. Rich soil is not a must for black-eyed Susans.
  4. Water the plant and wait for it to grow.

9. How to care for Rudbeckia

  1. Water the plants if the soil is dry.
  2. Keep dead flowers to bloom in September.
  3. Cut back plants if necessary.
  4. Look for diseases or pests.

10. Rudbeckia varieties to try

Variety nameColorsHeight and width

The black-eyed Susan vine plant is a tender perennial grown as an annual in temperate and cold zones. You can also grow the vine as a houseplant, but be careful as it can grow up to 8 ft 2+ m. In Caring for the vine Black-eyed Susan is most successful when the plant’s native African climate can be mimicked. Try growing a black-eyed Susan vine indoors or outdoors for a cheerful and bright flowering vine.

Black-eyed Susan Vine Plant

Thunbergia alata , or the black-eyed Susan vine, is a common houseplant. This is likely because it is easy to propagate from stem cuttings and therefore easy for owners to pass a piece of the plant over.

Native to Africa, the vine needs warm temperatures but also requires shelter from the hottest rays of the sun. The stems and leaves are green and the flowers are usually deep yellow, white or orange with black centers. There are also red, salmon, and ivory flower varieties.

Black-eyed Susan is a fast growing vine that needs a vertical support or trellis to support the plant. The vines wrap around themselves and anchor the plant to vertical structures.

Growing a black-eyed Susan vine

You can grow a black-eyed Susan vine from seed . Begin sowing indoors six to eight weeks before the last frost, or outdoors when soils warm to 60 F. 16 C. Seeds will emerge 10 to 14 days after sowing if temperatures are warm. 70 to 75 F. 21-24 C. It may take up to 20 days for it to emerge in colder areas.

Growing a black-eyed Susan vine from cuttings is easier. Spend the winter cutting several inches off the terminal end of a healthy plant. Remove the lower leaves and place them in a glass of water to root. Change the water every other day. Once you have thick roots, plant the start in potting soil in a well-draining pot. Grow the plant until spring and then transplant outdoors when temperatures rise and there is no chance of frost.

Place the plants in full sun with afternoon shade or in partially shaded locations when growing a black-eyed Susan vine. The vine is only hardy USDA plant hardiness zones 10 and 11. In other zones, take the plant to overwinter indoors.

How to Care for Black Eyeed Susan Vines

This plant has some special needs, so you will need some advice on how to care for black-eyed Susan’s vines.

First, the plant requires well-drained soil, but it will tend to wilt if the soil becomes too dry. The humidity level, especially for potted plants, is a very fine line. Keep it moderately moist but never soggy.

Black-eyed Susan vine care outdoors is easy as long as you water moderately, give the plant trellis, and a deadhead. You can prune it lightly in the higher areas where it grows as a perennial to keep the plant on the trellis or line. Young plants will benefit from plant ties to help them establish themselves in their growing structure.

Growing a black-eyed Susan vine indoors requires a bit more maintenance. Fertilize potted plants once a year in spring with a water-soluble plant food. Provide a stake to grow or plant in a hanging basket and let the vines fall gracefully.

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